Signals and 
Signal Maintenance on the 
Central Oregon and Pacific Railroad

Part 3 -- Semaphore Replacements


 
Part 1
Haulers and
Crossing Signals
Part 2
Sempaphores 
and Hi-Railing
Part 3
Semaphore
Replacements
Part 4
Odds & Ends
Wig-wags
NEW Part 5 NEW
Hugo to Glendale
Replacement Project

Click on the thumbnails below for larger images.
 
As we continue our hi-rail journey north, we encounter more Tri-Color signals.  This one is similar to the one we inspected back at the grade crossing except its control box doesn't include grade crossing controls.  It is typical of the single mast, double headed signals that Southern Pacific used to replace the semaphores in the early 90's before the line was conveyed to CORP.
Aside from the newer and larger cabinet, the electrical components shown in this cabinet look similar to those in the semaphore bases.  At the bottom are the batteries that actually power the lights. The large box above and to the left of the batteries is the charger.  The relays are above and to the right of the charger. 
As we continue up Rice Hill, we encounter more semaphores than tri-colors.  There appears to be no pattern in how the SP chose to replace the old signals.  Here in some of the most remote and picturesque country north of Roseburg, we find a length of continuous welded rail awaiting placement.  Semaphores and welded rail -- another study in contrasts on the Siskiyou Line.
The state of the art in signals on the Central Oregon and Pacific is this ElectroCode color light signal installed in November, 1998.  It is located at the south end of the Roseburg yard and is one of only two currently installed on the railroad.  It features twin masts mounted on the electrical cabinet.  A ladder goes up one side of the cabinet to a catwalk between the masts.

Frequent travelers along Interstate 5 will notice another Electrocode signal installation along the tracks to the west of the freeway between Weaver and Tri City.

Electrocode Update:  Electrocode signals were installed on the 20 miles between Hugo and Glendale, Oregon.  Alpha Rail Pages has documented this conversion in CORP Signals Part 5.

Inside the equipment cabinet of the Electrocode signal, we find the usual array of batteries near the floor with the battery charger just above them.  On the shelf above the batteries there are older relays that help govern the next signal.  But, above the relays is a bank of solid state circuit boards that control this signal installation.  Of particular interest is the way this system doesn't use the pole line to communicate with the signal down the track.  Instead, it sends coded pulses of electricity (hence the term electrocode) down the rails.  In fact, the pole line to the south of this signal is out of service completely. 

In a way, this is an unusual case of the prototype imitating the model.  Model railroaders have been using digital command control for years and now, the prototype has adapted a form of it to their signal systems.

Another aspect of modern railroading's signaling and safety equipment is the trackside detector.  As cabooses were phased out in the 1980's talking detectors such as this one took over the job of checking for dragging equipment and hotboxes.  In mid-photo are the flappers that detect dragging equipment.  On the outside of each rail in the foreground are the infra red detectors that measure the temperature of each journal as it passes over the detector. 
This detector not only checks for dragging equipment and axle temperature, but it also registers train speeds, number  of axles and ambient temperature.  All this information  is recorded and stored for retrieval later.  Of course, if a defect is noted, it will announce on the radio the type of defect and the axle with the problem.  In this picture Rick is checking a printout of the past month's trains.  When a train is stopped with a defect, the crew can obtain a detailed printout of each axle's temperature.

All Photos Copyright 1999 by Larry Tuttle


Part 1
Haulers and
Crossing Signals
Part 2
Sempaphores 
and Hi-Railing
Part 3
Semaphore
Replacements
Part 4
Odds & Ends
Wig-wags
NEW Part 5 NEW
Hugo to Glendale
Replacement Project

       Special thanks to Rick Perry and the Central Oregon and Pacific Railroad

Return to the CORP Page
Return to AlphaRail Net

This page first built on March 3, 1999
 And last classified on December 2, 2000